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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
in pakistan this year while drastically increasing in yemen. according to the new america foundation, confirmed drone attacks fell to 46 from 72 in pakistan, while rising to 53 from 18 in yemen. the u.s. just recently admitted responsibility for a september attack in yemen that killed 11 civilians, including three children. rebels of the central african republic appeared to be on the verge of seizing control of the capital after taking at least 10 other towns. central african republic and president has urged foreign intervention from the u.s. and france to help him push back the rebel advance. the u.s. says it is a pact with its embassy as a precautionary safety measure. in india, a 17-year-old girl was gang raped has committed suicide after being pressured by police to drop the case and marry one of her attackers. the girl's death comes amidst growing national outrage over a spate of gang rapes ignored by india's police, including one on a public bus in delhi. on thursday, protests against rape in india continued nationwide. >> they are doing nothing about it. [indiscernible] it is
the national rifle association. we will host a debate on gun control between the gun honors for america and the coalition to stop gun violence. then we will speak to paul barrett, author of, "glock: the rise of america's gun." and we will get a report from the streets of cairo from sharif abdel kouddous. >> of voting among the division. egyptians headed to the polls on saturday in the sixth national election in nearly two years. this time, to vote on a referendum and a hotly disputed constitution. >> all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. president obama has vowed to take action against gun violence in the united states following the shooting rampage that left 27 people dead, including 20 young children, in newtown, connecticut. all of the children are aged 6 and 7. the gunman, 20-year-old adam lanza, shot his mother dead at their home before driving to the sandy hook elementary school and forcing his way inside. armed with high-powered rifle, two handguns and hundreds of rounds of ammunition, lanza shot up
weeks later, more than 10,000 of us, people from all over america, started walking from selma to montgomery. and by the time we made it to montgomery five days later, there were almost 30,000 black and white citizens-protestant, catholic, jewish, men, women, young people. it was like a holy march. and the congress debated the act, passed it, and on august 6, 1965, president lyndon johnson signed it into law. amy goodman: congressmember john lewis. we continue our conversation after break. [break] amy goodman: the morehouse college glee club performing "we shall overcome." morehouse college was the alma mater of dr. martin luther king jr. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman, as i continue with my interview with democratic congressmember john lewis of georgia, leader of the civil rights movement, risked his life numerous times marching for the right of all americans to vote. during the civil rights movement, he marched side by side with dr. king. he served as chair of the student nonviolent coordinating committee, helped organize t
, a neighborhood with one the densest concentrations of drug addicts in north america. the portland hosts the only legal injection site in north america, a center that's come under fire from canada's conservative government. i asked dr. matÉ to talk about his patients. >> the hardcore drug addicts that i treat, but according to all studies in the states, as well, are, without exception, people who have had extraordinarily difficult lives. and the commonality is childhood abuse. in other words, these people all enter life under extremely adverse circumstances. not only did they not get what they need for healthy development, they actually got negative circumstances of neglect. i don't have a single female patient in the downtown eastside who wasn't sexually abused, for example, as were many of the men, or abused, neglected and abandoned serially, over and over again. and that's what sets up the brain biology of addiction. in other words, the addiction is related both psychologically, in terms of emotional pain relief, and neurobiological development to early adversity. >> what does the title of yo
. he should appear and confessed to the world that he committed these crimes so that america could show itself as democratic and fair. >> in a dramatic scene yesterday on capitol hill, several democrats walked out of congressional hearings on the contraception rule. carol maloney of new york criticized the panel at the hearing, which was exclusively male. >> what i want to know is, where are the women? when i look at this panel, i do not see one single woman representing the tens of millions of women across the country who want and need insurance coverage for basic preventive health carere servic, including family planning. where are the women? >> we are joined by sandra flu, the female would this not allowed to testify at the all male hearing on capitol hill yesterday. >> i was there to talk about the women whose voices have been affected by this policy, who have been affected financially, emotionally, and medically. what i wanted the members of congress and the public to hear is what a difference this policy could make to their lives. i wanted to talk about how birth control is not [n
the coast of maine, remote and solitary, held special meaning for one of america's greatest artists. in a letter to his brother, winslow homer said of his surroundings, "there is certainly some strange power "that has an overlook on me, directing my life. "that i am in the right place, there is no doubt. "i have found something interesting to work at and time to do it." for almost three decades, winslow homer made his home on prouts neck, a rocky point just south of portland, maine. his house still stands on the high ground overlooking the sea. visiting thelace where homer lived and worked is john wilmerding, deputy director of the national gallery of art. homer's studio was a remodeled stable set about 200 yards from a large summerhouse thatis older brother bought in 1883. although homer was close to his family, he enjoyed the solitude his studio provided, but most of all, it was the ocean outside which reall made this place so important to him. the love of nature was very much a part of homer's time. his family joined the growing number of americans in the late 19th century who co
problem is a bigger problem in the inner city, but clearly in the suburbs of america, in the heartland of america, many folks with illegal guns, also sometimes engage in some of these or many of these violent acts. we're having a conversation for those turning their guns in, there is a section of the american people who are desperately clinging to this idea of their right to continue to have guns, even assault weapons. in the connecticut case, the mother watrained her children ad the use of guns. many americans do that. could you talk a little more about the culture of violence in america from your perspective? >> i believe in the second amendment, but as the president said, there is an awfully large gap between having the right to bear arms and then being able to own an assault rifle. i think there are certain kinds of weaponry that civilians simply should not have access to. there are certain kinds of ammunition that civilians should not have access to. i don't know why a civilian would need a hollow point bullet. that is something we ought to be able to regulate severely. i do belie
. i want to turn to paul barrett, who we had on yesterday's, author of "bloch: the rise of america's gun." i asked about senator feinstein's announcement that she will reintroduce the ban on assault weapons on the first of the senate. >> i will read the legislation very closely when it is out. i have to say i'm skeptical. the 1994 so-called assault weapons ban was one of the most porous, ineffective pieces of legislation that i personally have the opportunity to study. it was shot through with loopholes. it had no applicability to weapons that were made and sold on the day before enactment. and the fact it was coming for a period of years gave gun manufacturers an opportunity to run their factories overtime and to build up huge stockpiles of the weapons. so we will see. but if congress is not proposing to ban weapons that are already out there, then that leaves millions and millions of weapons already out there. >> that was paul barrett, author of "glock: the rise of america's gun." rebecca peters, if you could compare to the legislation that was passed in australia after the massa
, they are the ones collecting all the energy, south america. that's why these-- the countries down below, south america and australia, in december, would be having their summers, yeah? and we have ours just the opposite. it kind of makes sense, doesn't it? yes. look at the globe. do you see? look at-- in the summertime, there's the tip toward you, huh? now, here's-- it says the old sun right here. everything i can see-- you guys can't get back and you'll see this. but i can see amsterdam right there. all right? now, amsterdam, that's halfway mark. amsterdam is right in the sun, okay? so it's day, day, day, day, day, day, day, day, day, day, day, day, day, day, day, day. sun down. night, night, night, night, night. sun up. day, day, day, day. [laughter] - get the idea? - yeah. so they're in the daylight most of the turn. how about at a place that's on the daylight all of the turn that's just barely on that? of course, the north pole is. so when at north pole, daylight is 24 hours a day. but you come down to a certain point where it just comes up-- in fact, i can see it right here. it's up here.
disappeared from the united states, and we conquered smallpox in the americas in 1971 and worldwide in 1977, sort of lent us confidence that really, there wasn't much that we couldn't do. as a result, the center began to diversify, to broaden its focus. and so we expanded into chronic disease areas. the national institute for occupational safety and health was incorporated into cdc in the early 1970s. much more recently, we've gotten into areas surrounding injury control and prevention. and of course we realized in the last few years that the infectious disease agenda is not over. certainly it's not in the developing world where it still causes a very heavy burden. apart from what aids is doing as probably the most egregious example that we've seen in our lifetimes, having surpassed malaria as the largest killer of people in africa, is tuberculosis, for which we've had good drugs, haven't used them wisely or enough in years past to reduce some of the problems that we're seeing today. and that's getting more and more serious now with multiply resistant strains of tuberculosis. tuberculosis i
: if the king is coming or if someone from america or france is coming, we are asked to go out and show our happiness, our appreciation that they come to see us. we go out, around a hundred of us, and we clap our hands and hit this piece of metal that we have. it is quite a show. you can really appreciate it. if the government needs the guild steward in some cases like that, they call him. that's the role of the guild steward. keach: archaeologists believe that in ancient ostia specialists also organized themselves into craft associations and guilds. the shipwrights, for example, had a large and active guild. these are the ruins of what is believed to have been their clubhouse. it was a magnificent building with a suite of dining rooms arranged around a long, indoor fish pond that would have been lined with imported marble. claridge: the principal feature is this large, central court which provides ample space for all sorts of perhaps alfresco dining as well that they could actually put their couches out in the garden and dine outside. otherwise, there would be entertainments laid on -- dan
languages still spoken in central america. over the centuries, the words have changed, but still they echo the past. the maya have not used hieroglyphs since the sixteenth century, when spanish bishop landa made his observations of life in the yucatan. at that time, landa recorded what he called a mayan a-b-c. but this alphabet didn't make sense until scholars realized that landa had misunderstood just how the maya wrote. linda schele deciphers mayan texts. the maya used two kinds of signs to spell things. one is called a logograph because it represents a whole word. the other is a phonetic sign that represents a syllable. for instance, if they wanted to spell the word "jaguar," they could just use a picture of the animal. the word for "jaguar" in maya is "balam," okay ? now any maya who saw the jaguar head is going to say "balam," just like you're an english speaker, you see the jaguar, you'd say "jaguar." but there is more than one cat. so they could draw their jaguar head... and they could put a sign in front of it that tells you how to pronounce the first part of the word as "ba." this
election victory speech, he broke his silence on climate change, what it would do to america's children. he then subsequently said that he wants to be a global leader on climate change, but the position that has been taken by the united states in these talks is business as usual, has not reflected the urgency of what has just happened in the united states through hurricane sandy, the fact that there is massive drought in many parts of the country itself, and huge climate impacts happening in a world elsewhere. the bottom line is, the politics of the negotiation is out of touch with all the science says, and president obama and other political leaders need to recognize, nature does not negotiate. we have to change. sadly, these negotiators are not reflecting that urgency and the ambition of the kind of change we need to see. >> i want to turn for a moment to my questioning of jonathan pershing. he was part of a news conference yesterday, along with other climate negotiators from around the world. i think the conference was called to meet the negotiators. this is what's the u.s. negotiator jo
first speech after elected, said that he didn't want our children to live in an america that is threatened by the destructive power of a warming planet. yesterday, a number of civil society groups held a news conference and they said -- greenpeace said that tod stern and got the pershing have come to doha with a goal of obstructing the process. he said that it was disrespectful of president obama to inflict on us to the bureau negative negotiators to act as if the commerce that he made after the election were never made. obama should pick up the phone and tell his delegates to follow his lead or alternatively return to washington. jonathan, are you calling president obama's wishes, and how you respond to thcivil sociy groups who say that the u.s. is the leader of stricter to any kind of negotiatied deal? >> all have no comment on the first part. on the second piece, the united states' role is engaging actively in the discussions. we are one of the significant triggers to the intellectual thinking in the process. we will continue to do that. it does not mean that we will
. and i held these believes america has -- with guns. it is part of american history. gun owners and people who handle guns, they know how to keep them safe and be responsible. our politicians will do whatever they can to make sure our kids are safe. and to know every time something like columbine, at virginia tech, or aurora were happening, i would avert my eyes and i will still think that something will be done. but all of those police were shattered on friday -- the leafs were shattered on friday. i think we all need to speak up. >> andrei nikitchyuk of newtown, connecticut, in washington to speak out for gun control. we will be back in a moment. ♪ [music break] >> this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman with nermeen shaikh. >> we stand the nation's capital as we turn of the so-called fiscal cliff till that could come to a vote as early as thursday. on monday, the white house issued a new offer to house republicans. the proposed leaving lower tax rates in place for everyone except those earning $400,000 and above, up from the $25
times? like, you can talk about traveling to south america, you can talk about traveling to the mainland. you can talk about traveling to europe, but can you go to the travel agent today and talk about traveling into time? we got new years coming up. we got a big one pretty soon, 2000, the year 2000, okay? and then 2001, 21st century, yeah? how about someone says, well, i'm not so much interested in that. i'm kind of a futurist. most of my friends are sort of like historians. they study history, where we've been. and it's kind of a real gas to know where we've been and where we are now. but my bit is where are we going? that's what i'm interested in. and what i'd like to do is i'd like to travel to the 25th century. and i'd like to see what human beings are doing for new year's eve in the year 2500, okay? what's it gonna be like then? now you go to your travel agent now and ask, you know what they're gonna say to you? the same thing they would have said to you a century ago if you told them you wanted to go from one part to the other part of the world in a metal airplane. they'd say, com
second, than you get out of all the power plants in north america, counting canada? 10 liters of water per second. i mean the poorest nation in the world can muster up 10 waters of liter-- 10 liters of water per second. that's sea water, any kind of water. if you could fuse the hydrogen in there, hmm, you talk about big energy, gang. enormous energy. you're gonna--all this stuff about oil and whale oil. i mean, already we've forgotten about whale oil, right? when you guys-- you grew up burning whale oil? no--petroleum, right? what did your great grandfathers--whale oil. the world's changing. now, when we get up to, where we can harness this kind of thing. hmm--different, different. 'cause the fuel is the most abundant element in the universe hydrogen. over 90% of the universe estimated to be hydrogen. the universe, gang, as far as a human condition, is the same design for where we are now, where we would've been, or where we're going? it's all fusion fuel out there, gang. now, we haven't been able to do that now because it's very difficult to do. it was difficult to make airplanes fly
billionaire richard stephenson, founder of the for-profit cancer trim centers of america. he was reportedly behind more than $20 in donations funneled to the freedomworks super pac in the weeks before the 2012 election. for more we're joined by kenneth vogel "democracy now!" videostream. he recently wrote an article, "inside the dick armey, freedomworks split." welcome to "democracy now!" dick armey came down with an armed guard to try to take over his organization? >> is a bizarre story. a lot led up to to get to that point. my understanding is, by reporting suggests there may have been members of the board of freedomworks who took his side and actually placed these two senior officials on its ministry of leave before this showdown with the armed guard transpired. nonetheless, it just made it that much uglier. it will be interesting to see what happens with freedomworks. while dick armey may have only been a figurehead by the point these tensions boiled over are manifested themselves in this coup, he was a rather powerful figurehead both as a former majority leader of the house who have a
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in the northern parts of america when their food would freeze. they'd have these canning cellars, they'd be down below 6 feet level. but sometimes, it would get so cold that the darn food would freeze, it would be in jars and they would be wiped out. you know why they be wiped out? because it turns out, when those jars of food freeze, it turns to ice and the ice does what? begin with a ex. expand. expands. and it makes glass-- begin with a br. break. and the food is wo. wiped out. okay? and the farmers feel uh. unhappy. and that's because they don't know their f. physics. physics, okay? let's look and see what's going on. what some of the farmers found out they could do. to prevent that from happening, some farmers would put down a great big tub of water right in the middle where all their cans of food are all arranged. and they keep the liquid water there, okay? now, so long as they keep that liquid water there and that water starts to freeze and turns to ice, and before it's solid ice, put some more water there, honey, they're not gonna have that canning cellar get below zero degrees. and you'
. >> there's been a longstanding shift in north america and europe toward para militarize policing using helicopter-style systems, using infrared sensors, using really, really heavy militarized weaponry. that has been longstanding fuelled by the war on drugs and other sort of explicit campaigns. more recently, there has been a big push since the end of the cold war by the big defense and security and i.t. companies to sell things like video surveillance systems, things like geographic mapping systems, and even more recently, drone systems that are being used in the assassination raids in afghanistan and pakistan and elsewhere. >> that is stephen graham, author of, "cities under siege: the new military urbanism." your final comment? expressing weaponization in the way we live. policing is one of the most obvious and current examples in that. i would suggest the pervasive development of john technology around the world that we are saying are being used for all sorts of purposes is really the thin edge of the wedge when it comes to these issues. we're going to see greater and greater weapon
says this project symbolizes urban farming in america. and it's a great way for people--regardless of their income-- to grow organic, healthy food. >> this is urban farming. yeah, this is how we do it. and again, you know, we're growing about 3 tons of food--about 6,000 pounds of food--a year, which could sustain several dozen families. and again it's not like we're producing--we're proud of the amount of food that we produce. but mostly it's about showing people how much they can grow in their own backyard. >> and i noticed one of mplantp had mold this morning. we transplanted it just in time. >> it's a lot of work. and they way that we're able to do it is because we've got so many volunteers like you saw just planting the trees. this is really popular. every weekend we've got literally dozens of people who come out here and volunteer. and so, that's how we run this garden is through volunteer labor. >> yeah. yeah. i like this farm so much sie all these fruits and vegetables growing here. >> you know, there's a victory gardens history in san francisco when people were
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)

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